The Great Debate: To Lie Or Not To Lie About Your Child’s Age On Social Media Platforms

Social Media is changing how we all interact on a daily basis. What is mind boggling to me is how many kids I see out and about with smart phones.

Now, I’m not talking about teenagers, I am talking about kids that are 8-12 years old.

Most kids in this age group do not have jobs to pay for the phone and/or assist Mom and Dad in paying the monthly data fee. And the other thing that really bothers me is that these kids are on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and other platforms. These kids are brilliant, and I mean that in a good way!

Our kids are smart and it’s up to us as parents and society to make sure our kids are safe while online. So, my question to all of you is, “How do all of these kids open up accounts on these social media platforms?” I have been told by many that the parents do it for them. I recently posted this question in a Facebook group and two parents responded that they would never lie about their kids’ age to open up a social media account for them. I am assuming I received a low response, as some did not want to admit they had done it. 

Yes, it’s probably poor judgement on the parent’s part. After all, we all make mistakes as parents, as we live and learn. If you are one of these parents that has lied about your child’s age so they can have these social media accounts, I hope you are right alongside them.

Password Information

Make sure you have all passwords to every single one of your child’s social media accounts. Let your child know that you will have access to them 24/7.

Educate Yourself

If you realize you made a mistake by allowing your tween to be involved in social media, you can delete the accounts or educate yourself. You, as a parent, need to know how to use these accounts, as it’s the only way you can help protect your child while online. Here’s a great tip for you, head on over to YouTube and search out the social media platforms your child is on. You must understand them!

Parental Controls For Smart Phones

Check with your cell phone carrier to sign up for parental controls that will allow you access to your child’s cell phone. Most have services that allow you to see their texts, phone calls, and even location monitoring.

Smart phones are changing how we all interact. Make smart decisions when it comes to your kids and smart phones. Smart phones connect people all over the world with the touch of a key. When you give your child a smart phone to use, you are giving them access to the world. Think about that- that’s a LOT of people!

Remember, your kids are watching your every move. When you lie about your child’s age on a social media platform, what message are you sending them? And just because a social media platform says a 13 year old can sign up, that does not mean every 13 year old is mature enough to handle it. Be smart so your family can be safe online.

If you are a parent, at what age have you or will you allow your child to be involved in Social Media? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this hot topic.

 

 

2 thoughts on “The Great Debate: To Lie Or Not To Lie About Your Child’s Age On Social Media Platforms

  1. Sue Scheff July 30, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    In reality, your child is going to sign up if they want to. It may as well be with you – the parent.
    There are age restrictions for a reason, however parents should know if their child is mature enough or responsible enough to be part of a social media networking site. The parent needs to help them understand why there are age restrictions – and why they are making this exception – since “lying” is not something we advocate.

    The fact is, if you don’t allow them on, I believe most cyber-savvy kids will get on anyway. Whether they have a friend or a sibling help them, they will find a way. This is why it is so important to teach digital citizenship from the moment your child is given a keypad (and earlier).

    Education is the key to awareness. Offline parenting is key to online safety.

    • admin July 30, 2014 at 9:20 pm

      I love the saying, “offline parenting is key to online safety.” Thanks for chiming in Sue!

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